About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Assessing the Impact of Applications of Digital Health Records ... Released: December 08, 2015
    On July 20, 2015, the IOM’s Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders held a public session at the 2015 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Washington, DC, to assess the impact of DHRs on Alzheimer’s disease research. “AD is the most common cause of dementia in older adults.” An estimated 46.8 million people worldwide are currently living with dementia, and the prevalence is expected to double every year for the next 20 years. Given the few therapies currently available to treat the symptoms of AD, compared to other central nervous system disorders, this session explored how DHRs may be used to help improve clinical trial design and methodology for AD research.
  • Opportunities to Promote Children's Behavioral Health: Health ... Released: October 07, 2015
    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) has several provisions that could greatly improve the behavioral health of children and adolescents in the United States. To explore how the ACA and other aspects of health care reform can support innovations to improve children’s behavioral health and sustain those innovations over time, the Forum on Promoting Children’s Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health held a workshop in Washington, DC, on April 1–2, 2015, titled “Opportunities to Promote Children’s Behavioral Health: Health Care Reform and Beyond.”
  • Providing Sustainable Mental and Neurological Health Care ... Released: October 01, 2015
    Mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders are the leading cause of disability and the 10th leading cause of death worldwide. Despite this high burden, there is a significant shortage of resources available to prevent, diagnose, and treat these disorders. Approximately four out of five people with serious MNS disorders living in low- and middle-income countries do not receive needed health services, with Sub-Saharan Africa having one of the largest treatment gaps.
  • Means of Violence: Workshop in Brief : Health and Medicine ... Released: September 17, 2015
    In an average day, there are approximately 4,000 violent deaths across the globe. In 1 week, there are 26,000, and in 1 month, 120,000. Workshop speaker James Mercy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) highlighted that these figures are directly influenced by the means and methods selected as tools of violence and their degree of lethality; simply put, means matter.
  • Mental Disorders and Disabilities Among Low-Income ... Released: September 09, 2015
    Since 1975, the Social Security Administration (SSA) has paid benefits to poor children with disabilities through the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. In 2013, approximately 1.3 million children received SSI disability benefits, roughly half of whom qualified primarily due to a mental disorder. In response to considerable and recurring interest in the growth and sustainability of the SSI program for children, SSA commissioned the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to identify trends in the prevalence of mental disorders among U.S. children and to compare those trends to changes observed in the SSI childhood disability population.
  • Non-Invasive Neuromodulation of the Central Nervous System ... Released: July 27, 2015
    Given the growing interest in non-invasive neuromodulation technologies, the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders convened a workshop, inviting a range of stakeholders—including developers of devices and new technologies, researchers, clinicians, ethicists, regulators, and payers—to explore the opportunities, challenges, and ethical questions surrounding the development, regulation, and reimbursement of these devices for the treatment of nervous system disorders as well as for non-therapeutic uses, including cognitive and functional enhancement.
  • Enabling Discovery, Development, and Translation of ... Released: July 22, 2015
    On February 24, 2015, the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous Disorders convened key stakeholders at a workshop in Washington, DC, to explore how best to enable the discovery, development, and translation of treatments for cognitive dysfunction in depression, including a focus on the regulatory path forward.
  • Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use ... Released: July 14, 2015
    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened an expert committee to identify key steps to ensure that evidence-based, high-quality care is provided to individuals receiving mental health and substance use services. The resulting report, Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders, details the reasons for the gap between what is known to be effective and what is currently practiced, and it offers recommendations for how best to address this gap by proposing a framework that can be used to establish standards for psychosocial interventions.
  • Financial Incentives to Encourage Development of Therapies ... Released: July 06, 2015
    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders, in collaboration with the IOM Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation, convened a workshop on January 20–21, 2015, to explore policy changes that might increase private sector investment in research and development (R&D) innovation that fills unmet medical needs for CNS disorders.
  • Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and ... Released: June 18, 2015
    On August 11–12, 2014, the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) Forum on Global Violence Prevention, in a collaborative partnership with the Uganda National Academy of Sciences (UNAS), convened a workshop focused on informing and creating synergies within a diverse community of researchers, health workers, and decision makers committed to promoting IPV-prevention efforts that are innovative, evidence-based, and crosscutting. This collaborative workshop also fulfills the forum’s mandate, which in part requires it to engage in multisectoral, multidirectional dialogue that explores crosscutting approaches to violence prevention.