About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Health Literacy and Palliative Care: Workshop Summary ... Released: May 20, 2016
    To explore the relationship between palliative care and health literacy, and the importance of health literate communication in providing high-quality delivery of palliative care, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Health Literacy convened this 1-day public workshop featuring presentations and discussions that exam­ined the effect of low health literacy on all aspects of palliative care.
  • Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic ... Released: April 28, 2016
    Recognizing the current challenges that may impede the integration of genomics into clinical practice, the Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health (now called the Roundtable on Genomics and Precision Health) hosted a workshop on November 19, 2015 to explore the methods and approaches of implementation science for their potential ability to improve the integration of genomics into medicine.
  • Advancing the Discipline of Regulatory Science for Medical ... Released: April 20, 2016
    The field of endeavors known as "regulatory science" has grown out of the need to link and integrate knowledge within and among basic science research, clinical medicine, and other specific scientific disciplines whose focus, aggregation, and ultimate implementation could inform biomedical product development and regulatory decision making. On October 20–21, 2015, the Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation held a public workshop to facilitate dialogue among stakeholders about the current state and scope of regulatory sciences, opportunities to address barriers to the discipline's success, and avenues for fostering collaboration across sectors. This report is a summary of the workshop.
  • Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in ... Released: April 11, 2016
    Viral hepatitis is the seventh leading cause of death in the world, killing more people than road traffic injuries, HIV and AIDS, or diabetes. Every year chronic viral hepatitis, of which hepatitis B and C are the most common forms, kills a million people, roughly 20,000 of them in the United States. These deaths could be prevented. Hepatitis B vaccine conveys 95 percent immunity, and new therapies for hepatitis C cure the vast majority of patients.
  • Global Health Impacts of Vector-Borne Diseases: Workshop ... Released: April 05, 2016
    Pathogens transmitted among humans, animals, or plants by insects and arthropod vectors have been responsible for significant morbidity and mortality throughout recorded history. Such vector-borne diseases—including malaria, dengue, yellow fever, plague, trypanosomiasis, and leishmaniasis—together accounted for more human disease and death in the 17th through early 20th centuries than all other causes combined. Domestic and international capabilities to detect, identify, and effectively respond to vector-borne diseases are limited.
  • Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop ... Released: March 08, 2016
    David Kindig, Professor Emeritus and Emeritus Vice-Chancellor, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, said not only is there an overabundance of measures and indicators available for measuring various aspects of population health, but there have been multiple efforts to examine the nature, validity, uses, and usefulness of existing measures with the goal of simplifying existing sets to meet the needs of all decision makers, from policymakers to communities, without much success in meeting that goal.
  • Potential Research Priorities to Inform Public Health and ... Released: February 29, 2016
    Given the recent rapid spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) throughout the Americas and the presence of its vector mosquito species within parts of the United States, RADM Nicole Lurie, Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), determined an urgent need for additional research to better characterize ZIKV, especially those issues related to the means of transmission and infection during pregnancy.
  • Global Health Risk Framework: Governance for Global Health ... Released: January 13, 2016
    Since the 2014 Ebola outbreak, many public- and private-sector leaders have experienced a need for improved management of global public health emergencies. The effects of the Ebola epidemic go well beyond the three hardest-hit countries and beyond the health sector. Education, child protection, commerce, transportation, and human rights have all suffered. The National Academy of Medicine has managed an independent, international commission on improving international management and response to outbreaks. As input to this effort, the Institute of Medicine convened four workshops in the summer of 2015 to inform the commission report. These workshops examined questions of resilient health systems, research and development of medical products, pandemic financing, and governance for global health. Each workshop gathered diverse perspectives on a range of policies, operations, and options for collaboration to improve the global health system.
  • Global Health Risk Framework: Research and Development of ... Released: January 13, 2016
    Since the 2014 Ebola outbreak, many public- and private-sector leaders have experienced a need for improved management of global public health emergencies. The effects of the Ebola epidemic go well beyond the three hardest-hit countries and beyond the health sector. Education, child protection, commerce, transportation, and human rights have all suffered. The National Academy of Medicine has managed an independent, international commission on improving international management and response to outbreaks. As input to this effort, the Institute of Medicine convened four workshops in the summer of 2015 to inform the commission report. These workshops examined questions of resilient health systems, research and development of medical products, pandemic financing, and governance for global health. Each workshop gathered diverse perspectives on a range of policies, operations, and options for collaboration to improve the global health system.
  • Global Health Risk Framework: Resilient and Sustainable ... Released: January 13, 2016
    Since the 2014 Ebola outbreak, many public- and private-sector leaders have experienced a need for improved management of global public health emergencies. The effects of the Ebola epidemic go well beyond the three hardest-hit countries and beyond the health sector. Education, child protection, commerce, transportation, and human rights have all suffered. The National Academy of Medicine has managed an independent, international commission on improving international management and response to outbreaks. As input to this effort, the Institute of Medicine convened four workshops in the summer of 2015 to inform the commission report. These workshops examined questions of resilient health systems, research and development of medical products, pandemic financing, and governance for global health. Each workshop gathered diverse perspectives on a range of policies, operations, and options for collaboration to improve the global health system.