About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Global Issues in Water, Sanitation, and Health. Workshop ... Released: September 25, 2009
    Worldwide, over one billion people lack access to an adequate water supply. Recognizing water availability, water quality, and sanitation as fundamental issues underlying infectious disease emergence, the IOM’s Forum on Microbial Threats held a two-day public workshop.
  • Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging ... Released: September 22, 2009
    Zoonotic diseases can threaten both health and economies around the world. Unfortunately, for several reasons, disease surveillance in the United States and abroad is not very effective in alerting officials to emerging zoonotic diseases. In response to this challenge, the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council’s 2009 report Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging Zoonotic Diseases calls for the United States to take the lead, working with global health organizations to establish a global surveillance system that better integrates the human and animal health sectors, resulting in improved early detection and response.
  • Global Environmental Health: Research Gaps and Barriers for ... Released: July 16, 2009
    Humans rely on water, but the rapidly growing human population along with heightened urbanization and poor water management has led to a global water crisis. Increasingly limited water resources and severely limited access to safe drinking water worldwide highlights a global imperative to ensure universal and sustainable access to clean water. The Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine held a workshop on October 17-18, 2007, to stimulate efforts in the urgent issue and reversal of poor water quality, management, and policy.
  • The US Commitment to Global Health: Recommendations for ... Released: May 18, 2009
    Health is a highly-valued, visible, and concrete investment that has the power to both save lives and enhance the credibility of the United States in the eyes of the world. In 2008, the Institute of Medicine convened the expert Committee on the U.S. Commitment to Global Health to investigate the U.S. commitment to global health and to articulate a vision for future U.S. investments. In its 2009 report, The U.S. Commitment to Global Health: Recommendations for the Public and Private Sectors, the committee concludes that the U.S. government and U.S.-based foundations, universities, nongovernmental organizations, and commercial entities have an opportunity to improve global health.
  • Achieving Sustainable Global Capacity for Surveillance and ... Released: December 22, 2008
    One of the biggest threats today is the uncertainty surrounding the emergence of a novel pathogen or the re-emergence of a known infectious disease that might result in disease outbreaks with great losses of human life and immense global economic consequences. In June 2008, the Institute of Medicine’s and National Research Council’s Committee on Achieving Sustainable Global Capacity for Surveillance and Response to Emerging Diseases of Zoonotic Origin convened a workshop that addressed the reasons for the transmission of zoonotic disease and explored the current global capacity for zoonotic disease surveillance.
  • The US Commitment to Global Health: Recommendations for ... Released: December 09, 2008
    At this historic moment, the incoming Obama administration and leaders of the U.S. Congress have the opportunity to advance the welfare and prosperity of people within and beyond the borders of the United States through intensified and sustained attention to better health. The Institute of Medicine—with the support of four U.S. government agencies and five private foundations—formed an independent committee to examine the United States’ commitment to global health and to articulate a vision for future U.S. investments and activities in this area.
  • Global Climate Change and Extreme Weather Events. ... Released: September 24, 2008
    On December 4 and 5, 2007, the Forum on Microbial Threats hosted a public workshop in Washington, DC to consider the possible infectious disease impacts of global climate change and extreme weather events on human, animal, and plant health, as well as their expected implications for global and national security.
  • Design Considerations for Evaluating the Impact of PEPFAR. ... Released: September 15, 2008
    Design Considerations for Evaluating the Impact of PEPFAR is the summary of a 2-day workshop on methodological, policy, and practical design considerations for a future evaluation of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) interventions carried out under the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), which was convened by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) on April 30 and May 1, 2007.
  • Assessment of the Role of Intermittent Preventive Treatment ... Released: July 10, 2008
    The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation requested that the Institute of Medicine (IOM) conduct an independent assessment of the IPTi efficacy studies using sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTi-SP) that have been previously conducted by the IPTi Consortium. The IOM convened a committee to evaluate the evidence concerning IPTi-SP, which included addressing issues related to its utility and safety, as well as program management aspects of IPTi. The resulting letter report contains the findings, conclusions, and recommendations of the IOM committee.
  • Use of Dietary Supplements by Military Personnel : Health and ... Released: June 09, 2008
    The use of dietary supplements has become increasingly popular among members of the military. While some supplements may provide benefits to health, others could carry adverse effects that might compromise the readiness and performance of service members. The U.S. Department of Defense, the Samueli Institute, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), with additional support from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), requested that the Institute of Medicine (IOM) review the use of dietary supplements by military personnel, recommending a framework to identify the need for management of dietary supplement use within the military, and developing an approach to report adverse health events.