About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue ... Released: February 10, 2015
    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Social Security Administration asked the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to convene an expert committee to examine the evidence base for ME/CFS. In Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Redefining an Illness, the committee proposes new diagnostic criteria that will facilitate timely diagnosis and care and enhance understanding among health care providers and the public.
  • The Neuroscience of Gaming: Workshop in Brief : Health and ... Released: February 02, 2015
    More than 1.2 billion people worldwide play video games (online, via console, mobile phone, and other wireless devices), and many may be unaware that programmers often incorporate neuroscience into game design. Given the high prevalence of gaming in today’s society, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders hosted the Social Issues Roundtable at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting on November 16, 2014, in Washington, DC, to explore the neuroscience of video games, with emphasis on relevant scientific, ethical,and societal issues.
  • Advancing Therapeutic Development for Dry Age-Related ... Released: January 02, 2015
    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among white Americans and others of European descent, with lower prevalence among those of Asian, Latino, or African ancestry. The overall prevalence of AMD is approximately 8.7 percent worldwide and is expected to rise to 196 million people worldwide by 2020 and 288 million by 2040 (Wong et al., 2014). AMD typically affects people age 50 and older, and the prevalence increases with age, particularly after the age of 75.
  • Ensuring Patient Access to Affordable Cancer Drugs ... Released: November 10, 2014
    To explore the issue of cancer drug costs and patient access to affordable, appropriate drug therapies, the NCPF convened a workshop on ensuring patient access to affordable cancer drugs on June 9, 2014, in Washington, DC.
  • The Influence of Global Environmental Change on Infectious ... Released: September 03, 2014
    The Forum on Microbial Threats hosted a public workshop on September 24 and 25, 2013, to explore the scientific and policy dimensions of the impacts of global environmental change on infectious disease dynamics. Participants examined and discussed the observed and likely influences of environmental factors, acting both individually and synergistically on infectious disease dynamics. A range of approaches to improve global readiness and capacity for surveillance, detection, and response to emerging microbial threats to plant, animal, and human health in the face of ongoing global environmental change was also discussed.
  • Improving Access to Essential Medicines for Mental ... Released: July 14, 2014
    Recognizing the limitations of most SSA countries to effectively treat MNS disorders, the Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders of the Institute of Medicine convened a workshop in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in January 2014. The workshop brought together key stakeholders to discuss opportunities for achieving long-term affordable access to medicines for MNS disorders and to consider frameworks and strategies that have been successful in other countries and for different diseases. In particular, the workshop was organized around a series of focused discussions on four challenge areas: insufficient demand, inappropriate selection, ineffective supply chains, and high pricing and poor financing. This document summarizes the workshop.
  • Contemporary Issues for Protecting Patients in Cancer ... Released: July 02, 2014
    On February 24 and 25, 2014, the National Cancer Policy Forum of the Institute of Medicine convened a workshop to frame and discuss contemporary issues in human subjects protections as they pertain to cancer research, with the goal of identifying potential relevant policy actions. This document summarizes the workshop.
  • Microbial Ecology in States of Health and Disease - Workshop ... Released: February 18, 2014
    Investigations of microbial ecology in a variety of organisms and contexts have begun to illuminate the properties of host-associated microorganisms. These observations have revealed a complex and dynamic network of interactions across the spectrum of host, microbe, and environmental niches that may influence states of health and disease. Alterations in the composition and dynamics of the human microbiome have been associated with a variety of complex diseases — including such chronic conditions as cardiovascular disease, obesity, and inflammatory bowel diseases. This ecologically-informed view is a paradigm shift away from the conventional "one-microbe, one-disease" perspective of infection and may lead to new insights and approaches to health maintenance, disease prevention, and treatment methods in humans, animals, and plants. The IOM Forum on Microbial Threats held a public workshop in Washington, DC, to explore the scientific and therapeutic implications of microbial ecology in health and disease.
  • Oversight and Review of Clinical Gene Transfer Protocols ... Released: December 05, 2013
    In the 1970s, scientists first developed methods for manipulating DNA – resulting in what is called recombinant DNA. One of the applications of these methods, known as gene transfer, is an experimental technique involving the insertion of new genetic material into a human subject. In response to concerns about gene transfer, NIH established in 1974 the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) to provide oversight and a public forum for discussion. Many have argued that today RAC review is redundant and unnecessary in its current form. NIH asked the IOM to form a committee to determine whether gene transfer research continues to raise concerns that warrant extra oversight by the RAC of individual clinical trial protocols involving gene transfer. The committee was also asked to recommend criteria to guide when the RAC should, if deemed necessary, review individual protocols.
  • Improving and Accelerating Therapeutic Development for ... Released: November 25, 2013
    Although there is a high burden associated with nervous system disorders, development of new therapeutics remains stagnant. Over the last decade, fewer new drugs for nervous system disorders have garnered approval in comparison to other therapeutic areas. Current data suggest that drug development, from the start of a discovery program to regulatory approval, can take an average of 12 to 15 years. Building off of concepts discussed at a 2012 IOM workshop, the IOM Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders held a workshop to examine opportunities to accelerate early phases of drug development for nervous system drug discovery.