About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Comprehensive Cancer Care for Children and Families ... Released: July 20, 2015
    To examine specific opportunities and suggestions for driving optimal care delivery supporting survival with high quality of life, the National Cancer Policy Forum of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the American Cancer Society co-hosted a workshop on “Comprehensive Cancer Care for Children and Their Families,” which convened experts and members of the public on March 9 and 10, 2015, in Washington, DC.
  • Financial Incentives to Encourage Development of Therapies ... Released: July 06, 2015
    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders, in collaboration with the IOM Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation, convened a workshop on January 20–21, 2015, to explore policy changes that might increase private sector investment in research and development (R&D) innovation that fills unmet medical needs for CNS disorders.
  • Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce ... Released: April 21, 2015
    Given the changing landscape resulting from technological advances and the growing importance of interdisciplinary and collaborative science, the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders convened a workshop on October 28 and 29, 2014, in Washington, DC, to explore future workforce needs and how these needs should inform training programs.
  • Policy Issues in the Development and Adoption of Biomarkers ... Released: April 02, 2015
    A long-held goal in oncology has been to develop therapies that target the specific abnormalities in each patient’s cancer rather than simply treating cancers based on the tissue of origin. In the past decade, advances in technology have enabled researchers to relatively quickly and inexpensively determine, in minute detail, the genetic makeup of tumors.However, many challenges remain in effectively and efficiently developing new targeted cancer therapies and the biomarker tests that indicate which patients will be responsive to them, and in implementing them appropriately in clinical practice. These challenges include many policy issues, such as the level of oversight needed for test development and use, levels of evidence necessary for reimbursement decisions, and ways to meet informational needs of patients and care providers.
  • Emerging Viral Diseases: The One Health Connection ... Released: March 26, 2015
    Over the course of more than two decades, beginning with the landmark report Microbial Threats to Health in the United States (IOM, 1992), the Forum on Microbial Threats and its predecessors within the Institute of Medicine have examined the growing body of research on Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) and the growing list of diseases that fit this description.
  • Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue ... Released: February 10, 2015
    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Social Security Administration asked the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to convene an expert committee to examine the evidence base for ME/CFS. In Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Redefining an Illness, the committee proposes new diagnostic criteria that will facilitate timely diagnosis and care and enhance understanding among health care providers and the public.
  • The Neuroscience of Gaming: Workshop in Brief : Health and ... Released: February 02, 2015
    More than 1.2 billion people worldwide play video games (online, via console, mobile phone, and other wireless devices), and many may be unaware that programmers often incorporate neuroscience into game design. Given the high prevalence of gaming in today’s society, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders hosted the Social Issues Roundtable at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting on November 16, 2014, in Washington, DC, to explore the neuroscience of video games, with emphasis on relevant scientific, ethical,and societal issues.
  • Advancing Therapeutic Development for Dry Age-Related ... Released: January 02, 2015
    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among white Americans and others of European descent, with lower prevalence among those of Asian, Latino, or African ancestry. The overall prevalence of AMD is approximately 8.7 percent worldwide and is expected to rise to 196 million people worldwide by 2020 and 288 million by 2040 (Wong et al., 2014). AMD typically affects people age 50 and older, and the prevalence increases with age, particularly after the age of 75.
  • Ensuring Patient Access to Affordable Cancer Drugs ... Released: November 10, 2014
    To explore the issue of cancer drug costs and patient access to affordable, appropriate drug therapies, the NCPF convened a workshop on ensuring patient access to affordable cancer drugs on June 9, 2014, in Washington, DC.
  • The Influence of Global Environmental Change on Infectious ... Released: September 03, 2014
    The Forum on Microbial Threats hosted a public workshop on September 24 and 25, 2013, to explore the scientific and policy dimensions of the impacts of global environmental change on infectious disease dynamics. Participants examined and discussed the observed and likely influences of environmental factors, acting both individually and synergistically on infectious disease dynamics. A range of approaches to improve global readiness and capacity for surveillance, detection, and response to emerging microbial threats to plant, animal, and human health in the face of ongoing global environmental change was also discussed.