About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Global Health Impacts of Vector-Borne Diseases: Workshop ... Released: April 05, 2016
    Pathogens transmitted among humans, animals, or plants by insects and arthropod vectors have been responsible for significant morbidity and mortality throughout recorded history. Such vector-borne diseases—including malaria, dengue, yellow fever, plague, trypanosomiasis, and leishmaniasis—together accounted for more human disease and death in the 17th through early 20th centuries than all other causes combined. Domestic and international capabilities to detect, identify, and effectively respond to vector-borne diseases are limited.
  • Cancer Care in Low-Resource Areas: Cancer Prevention and ... Released: March 10, 2016
    Effective low-cost cancer control options are available for some malignancies, but these interventions remain inaccessible for many people in the world, especially those residing in low-resource communities. Disparities in cancer outcomes can also be found in high-income countries—communities within wealthier nations especially if they have challenges accessing cancer prevention and cancer care services.
  • Biomarker Tests for Molecularly Targeted Therapies: Key to ... Released: March 04, 2016
    Every patient is unique, and the evolving field of precision medicine aims to ensure that the right treatment is delivered to the right patient at the right time. To achieve this, health care providers are increasingly turning to advanced technologies known as biomarker tests for molecularly targeted therapies.
  • Ovarian Cancers: Evolving Paradigms in Research and Care ... Released: March 02, 2016
    Although recent years have seen promising advances in cancer research, there remain surprising gaps in the fundamental knowledge about and understanding of ovarian cancer, including basic biology, risk factors, diagnosis, delivery of care, and survivorship
  • Potential Research Priorities to Inform Public Health and ... Released: February 29, 2016
    Given the recent rapid spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) throughout the Americas and the presence of its vector mosquito species within parts of the United States, RADM Nicole Lurie, Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), determined an urgent need for additional research to better characterize ZIKV, especially those issues related to the means of transmission and infection during pregnancy.
  • Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques: Ethical, Social, and ... Released: February 03, 2016
    Mitochondrial replacement techniques (MRT) are designed to prevent the transmission of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diseases from mother to child. These diseases vary in presentation and severity, but common symptoms include developmental delays, seizures, weakness and fatigue, muscle pain, vision loss, and heart problems, leading to morbidity and in some cases premature death.
  • Global Health Risk Framework: Governance for Global Health ... Released: January 13, 2016
    Since the 2014 Ebola outbreak, many public- and private-sector leaders have experienced a need for improved management of global public health emergencies. The effects of the Ebola epidemic go well beyond the three hardest-hit countries and beyond the health sector. Education, child protection, commerce, transportation, and human rights have all suffered. The National Academy of Medicine has managed an independent, international commission on improving international management and response to outbreaks. As input to this effort, the Institute of Medicine convened four workshops in the summer of 2015 to inform the commission report. These workshops examined questions of resilient health systems, research and development of medical products, pandemic financing, and governance for global health. Each workshop gathered diverse perspectives on a range of policies, operations, and options for collaboration to improve the global health system.
  • Global Health Risk Framework: Pandemic Financing ... Released: January 13, 2016
    Since the 2014 Ebola outbreak, many public- and private-sector leaders have experienced a need for improved management of global public health emergencies. The effects of the Ebola epidemic go well beyond the three hardest-hit countries and beyond the health sector. Education, child protection, commerce, transportation, and human rights have all suffered. The National Academy of Medicine has managed an independent, international commission on improving international management and response to outbreaks. As input to this effort, the Institute of Medicine convened four workshops in the summer of 2015 to inform the commission report. These workshops examined questions of resilient health systems, research and development of medical products, pandemic financing, and governance for global health. Each workshop gathered diverse perspectives on a range of policies, operations, and options for collaboration to improve the global health system.
  • Appropriate Use of Advanced Technologies for Radiation ... Released: December 23, 2015
    In recent years, the field of oncology has witnessed a number of technological advances, including more precise radiation therapy and minimally invasive surgical techniques. The increased cost of these novel treatments without adequate assessment of how they affect patient outcomes is a pressing concern given that inappropriate use of expensive technologies is one of the key factors that threaten the affordability of cancer care in the United States.
  • Assessing the Impact of Applications of Digital Health Records ... Released: December 08, 2015
    On July 20, 2015, the IOM’s Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders held a public session at the 2015 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Washington, DC, to assess the impact of DHRs on Alzheimer’s disease research. “AD is the most common cause of dementia in older adults.” An estimated 46.8 million people worldwide are currently living with dementia, and the prevalence is expected to double every year for the next 20 years. Given the few therapies currently available to treat the symptoms of AD, compared to other central nervous system disorders, this session explored how DHRs may be used to help improve clinical trial design and methodology for AD research.