About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Biomarkers of Neuroinflammation: Proceedings of a Workshop ... Released: September 15, 2017
    Innate and adaptive immunity have become very important areas of investigation for psychiatric, neurologic, and neurodevelopmental disorders, and neurodegeneration resulting from traumatic brain injury. To address these gaps in understanding mechanisms and how to translate that understanding into therapeutics, the Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop on March 20–21, 2017, bringing together key leaders in the field from industry, academia, and governmental agencies to explore the role and mechanisms of neuroinflammation in a variety of central nervous system diseases.
  • Preparing for the Future of Disaster Health Volunteerism ... Released: August 15, 2017
    The Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Disasters and Emergencies of the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a 4-hour session at the 2017 Preparedness Summit. The participants discussed potential characteristics of society in the year 2042 and the key resources, tools, and opportunities necessary to support the development of a robust, scalable, and regularly engaged disaster health volunteer workforce prepared for such a future.
  • Strengthening the Disaster Resilience of the Academic ... Released: August 10, 2017
    The United States has experienced and continues to face the threat of disasters, and, like all entities, the academic biomedical research community can be affected. The academic biomedical research community is a hub of employment, economic productivity, and scientific progress. Given the crucial contribution and substantial integration of these institutions into the national fabric, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened an expert committee to develop recommendations and guidance to enhance the disaster resilience of the academic biomedical research community.
  • Integrating the Patient and Caregiver Voice into Serious ... Released: July 14, 2017
    Millions of people—infants, children, adults, and their families—are currently coping with serious illness in the United States. Efforts are intensifying to improve overall care quality through the delivery of person-centered and family-oriented services, for patients of all ages and across disease stages, care settings, and specialties. While aging Baby Boomers are increasing the proportion of patients in the Medicare population over time, the sickest and most vulnerable patients needing health system support and other services to meet their complex needs can be found across the age spectrum and in a broad range of care settings, from perinatal care to geriatric care.
  • Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing ... Released: July 13, 2017
    Drug overdose, driven largely by overdose related to the use of opioids, is now the leading cause of unintentional injury death in the United States. The ongoing opioid crisis lies at the intersection of two public health challenges: reducing the burden of suffering from pain and containing the rising toll of the harms that can arise from the use of opioid medications. Chronic pain and opioid use disorder both represent complex human conditions affecting millions of Americans and causing untold disability and loss of function. In the context of the growing opioid problem, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) launched an Opioids Action Plan in early 2016.
  • Enabling Precision Medicine: The Role of Genetics in Clinical ... Released: July 10, 2017
    Those involved in the drug development process face challenges of efficiency and overall sustainability due in part to high research costs, lengthy development timelines, and late-stage drug failures. Novel clinical trial designs that enroll participants based on their genetics represent a potentially disruptive change that could improve patient outcomes, reduce costs associated with drug development, and further realize the goals of precision medicine. On March 8, 2017, the Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation and the Roundtable on Genomics and Precision Health hosted the workshop Enabling Precision Medicine: The Role of Genetics in Clinical Drug Development.
  • Preventing Cognitive Decline and Dementia: A Way Forward ... Released: June 22, 2017
    Individuals, families, and societies around the world are concerned about dementia and the other forms of cognitive impairment that affect many older adults. It is now known that brain changes typically begin years—if not decades—before people show symptoms, which suggests that a window of opportunity exists to prevent, slow, or delay the onset of these conditions. Further, emerging evidence that the incidence and prevalence of dementia are declining in some high-income countries offers hope that public health interventions can be effective in preventing cognitive decline and dementia.
  • Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based ... Released: May 17, 2017
    Accessible and affordable housing can enable community living, maximize independence, and promote health for vulnerable populations. However, the United States faces a shortage of affordable and accessible housing for vulnerable low-income older adults and individuals living with disabilities. This shortage is expected to grow over the coming years given the population shifts leading to greater numbers of older adults and of individuals living with disabilities.
  • Integrating Clinical Research into Epidemic Response: The ... Released: April 12, 2017
    The 2014 Ebola epidemic in western Africa was the longest and deadliest Ebola outbreak in history, resulting in 28,616 cases and 11,310 deaths. In the midst of the rapidly spreading, highly dangerous contagious disease—with no Ebola-specific vaccines or therapeutics available to help curb the epidemic—the international community implemented clinical trials on investigational agents, not yet studied in humans for safety or efficacy.
  • Exploring the State of the Science in the Field of Regenerative ... Released: March 15, 2017
    The Forum on Regenerative Medicine hosted its first public workshop with the goal of developing a broad understanding of the opportunities and challenges associated with regenerative medicine cellular therapies and related technologies. Stakeholder groups, including research scientists, clinicians, and representatives from patient groups and industry, presented their perspectives and participated in discussions during the workshop, which focused on an exploration of the state of the science of cell-based regenerative therapies within the larger context of patient care and policy. The workshop rapporteurs have prepared this proceedings as a factual summation of the session discussions.