About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Graduate Medical Education Outcomes and Metrics ... Released: March 27, 2018
    Graduate medical education (GME) is critical to the career development of individual physicians, to the functioning of many teaching institutions, and to the production of our physician workforce. The current lack of established GME outcome metrics limits our ability to assess the impact of individual graduates, the performance of GME programs and teaching institutions, and the collective contribution of GME graduates to the physician workforce.
  • The Safety and Quality of Abortion Care in the United States ... Released: March 16, 2018
    Health care quality is a multidimensional concept. With support from six private foundations, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a committee to examine the available evidence on the safety and quality of different abortion methods, health facilities, and types of clinicians as well as the potential physical and mental health impacts on women. This resulting report provides a comprehensive review of the state of the science.
  • Health-Care Utilization as a Proxy in Disability Determination ... Released: March 01, 2018
    The Social Security Administration (SSA) administers two programs that provide benefits based on disability: the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program and the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. The SSDI program provides disability benefits to people who are under the full retirement age and are no longer able to work because of a disabling medical condition or because they have a terminal illness. The SSI program is a means-tested income-assistance program for disabled, blind, and aged people who have limited income and resources regardless of their prior participation in the labor force.
  • Evaluation of the Department of Veterans Affairs Mental ... Released: January 31, 2018
    Approximately 4 million U.S. veterans supported the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan—Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation New Dawn—and many have need for mental health care services. Under a Congressional mandate responding to concerns about the health care experience of these veterans, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) asked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to assemble a committee of experts to assess veterans’ ability to access mental health services at the VA, as well as the quality of those services.
  • Incorporating Weight Management and Physical Activity ... Released: December 01, 2017
    The National Cancer Policy Forum held a public workshop in February 2017 to examine the potential for weight management and physical activity interventions to improve health outcomes for cancer survivors. The workshop, Incorporating Weight Management and Physical Activity throughout the Cancer Care Continuum, highlighted the current evidence base, gaps in knowledge, and research needs on the associations among obesity, physical activity, weight management, and health outcomes for cancer survivors.
  • Making Medicines Affordable: A National Imperative : Health ... Released: November 30, 2017
    Over the past several decades, the biopharmaceutical sector in the United States has been successful in developing and delivering effective drugs for improving health and fighting disease, and many medical conditions that were long deemed untreatable can now be cured or managed effectively. At the same time, spending on prescription drugs has been rising dramatically, to the point that many individuals have difficulty paying for the drugs that they or their family members need.
  • Models and Strategies to Integrate Palliative Care Principles ... Released: October 24, 2017
    The Roundtable on Quality Care for People with Serious Illness hosted a full-day workshop on April 27, 2017 to explore Models and Strategies to Integrate Palliative Care Principles into Care for People with Serious Illness. The workshop aimed to highlight innovative models of community-based care for people of all ages facing serious illness.
  • The Drug Development Paradigm in Oncology: Proceedings ... Released: July 24, 2017
    Advances in cancer research have led to an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning the development of cancer and how the immune system responds to cancer. This influx of research has led to an increasing number and variety of cancer therapies in the drug development pipeline. Compared with standard chemotherapies, these new cancer therapies may demonstrate evidence of benefit at an earlier stage of development.
  • Integrating the Patient and Caregiver Voice into Serious ... Released: July 14, 2017
    Millions of people—infants, children, adults, and their families—are currently coping with serious illness in the United States. Efforts are intensifying to improve overall care quality through the delivery of person-centered and family-oriented services, for patients of all ages and across disease stages, care settings, and specialties. While aging Baby Boomers are increasing the proportion of patients in the Medicare population over time, the sickest and most vulnerable patients needing health system support and other services to meet their complex needs can be found across the age spectrum and in a broad range of care settings, from perinatal care to geriatric care.
  • Cancer Care in Low-Resource Areas: Cancer Treatment ... Released: May 23, 2017
    Though cancer was once considered to be a problem primarily in wealthy nations, low- and middle-income countries now bear a majority share of the global cancer burden. Disparities in cancer outcomes also exist in high-income countries—communities within wealthier nations can experience worse cancer outcomes, especially if they have challenges in accessing cancer prevention and cancer care services.