About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Infectious Disease Movement in a Borderless World. ... Released: March 12, 2010
    As a result of our global interconnectedness, infectious diseases emerge more frequently; spread greater distances; pass more easily between humans and animals; and change rapidly into new and more virulent strains. To explore issues related to infectious disease movement in a borderless world, the Forum on Microbial Threats hosted a workshop December 16-17, 2008, summarized in this document.
  • The Domestic and International Impacts of the 2009-H1N1 ... Released: December 29, 2009
    This report summarizes a workshop held in mid-September 2009 on the domestic and international responses to the H1N1 influenza A pandemic.
  • Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price ... Released: December 01, 2009
    In 2007 and 2008, the world witnessed a dramatic increase in food prices. To better understand and find ways to address these issues, the Institute of Medicine held the workshop "Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis." This report summarizes the workshop discussions.
  • Global Issues in Water, Sanitation, and Health. Workshop ... Released: September 25, 2009
    Worldwide, over one billion people lack access to an adequate water supply. Recognizing water availability, water quality, and sanitation as fundamental issues underlying infectious disease emergence, the IOM’s Forum on Microbial Threats held a two-day public workshop.
  • Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging ... Released: September 22, 2009
    Zoonotic diseases can threaten both health and economies around the world. Unfortunately, for several reasons, disease surveillance in the United States and abroad is not very effective in alerting officials to emerging zoonotic diseases. In response to this challenge, the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council’s 2009 report Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging Zoonotic Diseases calls for the United States to take the lead, working with global health organizations to establish a global surveillance system that better integrates the human and animal health sectors, resulting in improved early detection and response.
  • Live Variola Virus: Considerations for Continuing Research ... Released: July 10, 2009
    Smallpox was a devastating disease that plagued humankind throughout history. Its eradication in 1980 was a monumental achievement for the global health community. All acknowledged stocks of variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, or materials that might contain the virus, have been transferred to two World Health Organization approved repositories. During the period since eradication, the World Health Assembly (WHA) has debated whether to retain or destroy these stocks of live variola virus. This question will be reconsidered in 2010. In anticipation of this decision, the IOM was asked to revisit the question of scientific needs for live variola virus.
  • The US Commitment to Global Health: Recommendations for ... Released: May 18, 2009
    Health is a highly-valued, visible, and concrete investment that has the power to both save lives and enhance the credibility of the United States in the eyes of the world. In 2008, the Institute of Medicine convened the expert Committee on the U.S. Commitment to Global Health to investigate the U.S. commitment to global health and to articulate a vision for future U.S. investments. In its 2009 report, The U.S. Commitment to Global Health: Recommendations for the Public and Private Sectors, the committee concludes that the U.S. government and U.S.-based foundations, universities, nongovernmental organizations, and commercial entities have an opportunity to improve global health.
  • Microbial Evolution and Co-Adaptation. A Tribute to the Life ... Released: April 09, 2009
    Dr. Joshua Lederberg – scientist, Nobel laureate, visionary thinker, and friend of the Forum on Microbial Threats – died on February 2, 2008. It was in his honor that the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Microbial Threats convened a public workshop on May 20-21, 2008, to examine Dr. Lederberg’s scientific and policy contributions to the marketplace of ideas in the life sciences, medicine, and public policy. The resulting workshop summary, Microbial Evolution and Co-Adaptation, demonstrates the extent to which conceptual and technological developments have, within a few short years, advanced our collective understanding of the microbiome, microbial genetics, microbial communities, and microbe-host-environment interactions.
  • Achieving Sustainable Global Capacity for Surveillance and ... Released: December 22, 2008
    One of the biggest threats today is the uncertainty surrounding the emergence of a novel pathogen or the re-emergence of a known infectious disease that might result in disease outbreaks with great losses of human life and immense global economic consequences. In June 2008, the Institute of Medicine’s and National Research Council’s Committee on Achieving Sustainable Global Capacity for Surveillance and Response to Emerging Diseases of Zoonotic Origin convened a workshop that addressed the reasons for the transmission of zoonotic disease and explored the current global capacity for zoonotic disease surveillance.
  • The US Commitment to Global Health: Recommendations for ... Released: December 09, 2008
    At this historic moment, the incoming Obama administration and leaders of the U.S. Congress have the opportunity to advance the welfare and prosperity of people within and beyond the borders of the United States through intensified and sustained attention to better health. The Institute of Medicine—with the support of four U.S. government agencies and five private foundations—formed an independent committee to examine the United States’ commitment to global health and to articulate a vision for future U.S. investments and activities in this area.