About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Preparing for the Future of HIV/AIDS in Africa: A Shared ... Released: November 29, 2010
    HIV/AIDS is a catastrophe globally but nowhere more so than in sub-Saharan Africa, which in 2009 accounted for 68 percent of cases worldwide and 69 percent of new infections. The IOM recommends that the United States and African nations move toward a strategy of shared responsibility such that these nations are empowered to take ownership of their HIV/AIDS problem and work to solve it.
  • Antibiotic Resistance: Implications for Global Health and ... Released: September 07, 2010
    Years of using, misusing, and overusing antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs has led to the emergence of multidrug-resistant “superbugs.” The IOM’s Forum on Microbial Threats held a public workshop April 6-7 to discuss the nature and sources of drug-resistant pathogens, the implications for global health, and the strategies to lessen the current and future impact of these superbugs.
  • Strategic Approach to the Evaluation of Programs ... Released: July 07, 2010
    At the request of Congress, the IOM will evaluate U.S. global programs to address HIV/AIDS. This report outlines the IOM’s strategic approach for this evaluation.
  • Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World: A ... Released: March 22, 2010
    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) accounts for nearly 30 percent of deaths in low and middle income countries each year, yet most governments, global health institutions, and development agencies have largely overlooked it. The IOM recommends strategies to reduce the global burden of CVD.
  • Infectious Disease Movement in a Borderless World. ... Released: March 12, 2010
    As a result of our global interconnectedness, infectious diseases emerge more frequently; spread greater distances; pass more easily between humans and animals; and change rapidly into new and more virulent strains. To explore issues related to infectious disease movement in a borderless world, the Forum on Microbial Threats hosted a workshop December 16-17, 2008, summarized in this document.
  • The Domestic and International Impacts of the 2009-H1N1 ... Released: December 29, 2009
    This report summarizes a workshop held in mid-September 2009 on the domestic and international responses to the H1N1 influenza A pandemic.
  • Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price ... Released: December 01, 2009
    In 2007 and 2008, the world witnessed a dramatic increase in food prices. To better understand and find ways to address these issues, the Institute of Medicine held the workshop "Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis." This report summarizes the workshop discussions.
  • Global Issues in Water, Sanitation, and Health. Workshop ... Released: September 25, 2009
    Worldwide, over one billion people lack access to an adequate water supply. Recognizing water availability, water quality, and sanitation as fundamental issues underlying infectious disease emergence, the IOM’s Forum on Microbial Threats held a two-day public workshop.
  • Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging ... Released: September 22, 2009
    Zoonotic diseases can threaten both health and economies around the world. Unfortunately, for several reasons, disease surveillance in the United States and abroad is not very effective in alerting officials to emerging zoonotic diseases. In response to this challenge, the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council’s 2009 report Sustaining Global Surveillance and Response to Emerging Zoonotic Diseases calls for the United States to take the lead, working with global health organizations to establish a global surveillance system that better integrates the human and animal health sectors, resulting in improved early detection and response.
  • Live Variola Virus: Considerations for Continuing Research ... Released: July 10, 2009
    Smallpox was a devastating disease that plagued humankind throughout history. Its eradication in 1980 was a monumental achievement for the global health community. All acknowledged stocks of variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, or materials that might contain the virus, have been transferred to two World Health Organization approved repositories. During the period since eradication, the World Health Assembly (WHA) has debated whether to retain or destroy these stocks of live variola virus. This question will be reconsidered in 2010. In anticipation of this decision, the IOM was asked to revisit the question of scientific needs for live variola virus.