About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Models and Strategies to Integrate Palliative Care Principles ... Released: October 24, 2017
    The Roundtable on Quality Care for People with Serious Illness hosted a full-day workshop on April 27, 2017 to explore Models and Strategies to Integrate Palliative Care Principles into Care for People with Serious Illness. The workshop aimed to highlight innovative models of community-based care for people of all ages facing serious illness.
  • Translating the Results of Hurricane Sandy Research Grants ... Released: September 15, 2017
    The workshop held in Washington DC, convened the public, past Hurricane Sandy Research Grants recipients, policy makers, and public health preparedness practice professionals to explore research findings and discuss opportunities for translation to future preparedness and response efforts. The workshop rapporteurs have prepared this proceedings as a factual summation of the session discussions.
  • Exploring the Translation of the Results of Hurricane Sandy ... Released: September 15, 2017
    The workshop Translating the Results of Hurricane Sandy Research Grants into Policy and Operations was convened on July 20, 2017, in Washington, DC, by the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine with the objective of exploring key findings from published Hurricane Sandy research grant projects, examining the impact of the scientific findings on disaster policy and operations, and discussing opportunities to translate the research findings to future preparedness response and recovery efforts.
  • Biomarkers of Neuroinflammation: Proceedings of a Workshop ... Released: September 15, 2017
    Innate and adaptive immunity have become very important areas of investigation for psychiatric, neurologic, and neurodevelopmental disorders, and neurodegeneration resulting from traumatic brain injury. To address these gaps in understanding mechanisms and how to translate that understanding into therapeutics, the Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop on March 20–21, 2017, bringing together key leaders in the field from industry, academia, and governmental agencies to explore the role and mechanisms of neuroinflammation in a variety of central nervous system diseases.
  • Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes ... Released: August 03, 2017
    For decades, nutrient intake recommendations have been issued through the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) established by consensus committees of the Institute of Medicine, and now the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (the National Academies). For each nutrient (e.g., vitamins, minerals, water, electrolytes, carbohydrate, or protein) deemed essential, DRI committees reviews the scientific literature to help inform nutrition standards of adequacy and toxicity for groups of people of different genders and at different life stages. These DRIs are used for planning and assessing the diets of apparently healthy individuals and groups.
  • The Drug Development Paradigm in Oncology: Proceedings ... Released: July 24, 2017
    Advances in cancer research have led to an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning the development of cancer and how the immune system responds to cancer. This influx of research has led to an increasing number and variety of cancer therapies in the drug development pipeline. Compared with standard chemotherapies, these new cancer therapies may demonstrate evidence of benefit at an earlier stage of development.
  • Integrating the Patient and Caregiver Voice into Serious ... Released: July 14, 2017
    Millions of people—infants, children, adults, and their families—are currently coping with serious illness in the United States. Efforts are intensifying to improve overall care quality through the delivery of person-centered and family-oriented services, for patients of all ages and across disease stages, care settings, and specialties. While aging Baby Boomers are increasing the proportion of patients in the Medicare population over time, the sickest and most vulnerable patients needing health system support and other services to meet their complex needs can be found across the age spectrum and in a broad range of care settings, from perinatal care to geriatric care.
  • Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious ... Released: June 16, 2017
    Building communication capacity is a critical piece of preparing for, detecting, and responding to infectious disease threats. Various organizations, including CDC (2011) and WHO (2008), have provided guidance on developing frameworks, standards, protocols, and conceptual approaches to communicating critical information during infectious disease outbreaks. Furthermore, governments and nongovernmental organizations have developed and implemented plans to address the gaps in communication capacity during these situations.
  • Cancer Care in Low-Resource Areas: Cancer Treatment ... Released: May 23, 2017
    Though cancer was once considered to be a problem primarily in wealthy nations, low- and middle-income countries now bear a majority share of the global cancer burden. Disparities in cancer outcomes also exist in high-income countries—communities within wealthier nations can experience worse cancer outcomes, especially if they have challenges in accessing cancer prevention and cancer care services.
  • Integrating Clinical Research into Epidemic Response: The ... Released: April 12, 2017
    The 2014 Ebola epidemic in western Africa was the longest and deadliest Ebola outbreak in history, resulting in 28,616 cases and 11,310 deaths. In the midst of the rapidly spreading, highly dangerous contagious disease—with no Ebola-specific vaccines or therapeutics available to help curb the epidemic—the international community implemented clinical trials on investigational agents, not yet studied in humans for safety or efficacy.