About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Integrating Clinical Research into Epidemic Response: The ... Released: April 12, 2017
    The 2014 Ebola epidemic in western Africa was the longest and deadliest Ebola outbreak in history, resulting in 28,616 cases and 11,310 deaths. In the midst of the rapidly spreading, highly dangerous contagious disease—with no Ebola-specific vaccines or therapeutics available to help curb the epidemic—the international community implemented clinical trials on investigational agents, not yet studied in humans for safety or efficacy.
  • Future Financial Economics of Health Professional Education ... Released: April 05, 2017
    The Government Accountability Office (GAO), World Health Organization (WHO), and the World Bank all agree that “an adequate, well-trained, and diverse health [care] workforce is essential for providing access to quality health [care] services.” However, according to the World Bank, efforts to scale up the supply of health workers are falling short. The resulting health workforce shortage affects people’s access to quality health care around the globe, and can result in untreated sickness, disability, and adverse economic consequences.
  • A National Strategy for the Elimination of Hepatitis B and C ... Released: March 28, 2017
    Each year, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus cause nearly 1.5 million deaths worldwide—more than HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria. Such loss of life comes at a cost to society through the direct expense of treatment as well as through the loss of adults in their prime. In an effort to describe a strategy for eliminating viral hepatitis as a U.S. public health problem by 2030, the National Academies, with support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable, convened an expert committee to outline a national strategy.
  • An Evidence Framework for Genetic Testing : Health and ... Released: March 27, 2017
    Advances in genetics and genomics are transforming medical practice, resulting in a dramatic growth of genetic testing in the health care system. The rapid development of new technologies, however, has also brought challenges, including the need for rigorous evaluation of the validity and utility of genetic tests, questions regarding the best ways to incorporate them into medical practice, and how to weigh their cost against potential short- and long-term benefits.
  • Implementing Evidence-Based Prevention by Communities to ... Released: March 20, 2017
    Communities also represent the front line in addressing many behavioral health conditions experienced by children, adolescents, young adults, and their families. Given the importance of communities in shaping the health and well being of young people, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a workshop in June 2016, to examine the implementation of evidence- based prevention by communities. Participants examined questions related to scaling up, managing, and sustaining science in communities. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.
  • Exploring the State of the Science in the Field of Regenerative ... Released: March 15, 2017
    The Forum on Regenerative Medicine hosted its first public workshop with the goal of developing a broad understanding of the opportunities and challenges associated with regenerative medicine cellular therapies and related technologies. Stakeholder groups, including research scientists, clinicians, and representatives from patient groups and industry, presented their perspectives and participated in discussions during the workshop, which focused on an exploration of the state of the science of cell-based regenerative therapies within the larger context of patient care and policy. The workshop rapporteurs have prepared this proceedings as a factual summation of the session discussions.
  • Health Insurance and Insights from Health Literacy: Helping ... Released: March 13, 2017
    The Roundtable on Health Literacy of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a public workshop to examine health insurance through the lens of health literacy, focusing on literacy related barriers to information and coverage as well as on possible solutions.
  • Therapeutic Development in the Absence of Predictive Animal ... Released: March 10, 2017
    Despite the high prevalence and burden of nervous system disorders, development of new therapeutics lags behind other disease areas. Gaps in understanding the underlying pathophysiology, a dearth of biomarkers, and limitations in the capacity of animal models to predict drug efficacy for human brain disorders have contributed to a high rate of late stage failures in drug development and decreased investment in neuroscience research programs at pharmaceutical companies. On September 12-13, 2016, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders hosted a public workshop to explore opportunities to accelerate drug development absent predictive animal models.
  • Promoting the Educational Success of Children and Youth ... Released: February 28, 2017
    Effectively educating children who are learning English as their second language is a national challenge with consequences both for individuals and for American society. Despite their potential, many young English learners are struggling to meet the requirements for academic success, a difficulty that jeopardizes their prospects for success in post-secondary education and in the workforce. A committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine examined how evidence relevant to the development of English learners can inform policies and practices that can result in better educational outcomes for these young people.
  • Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne ... Released: February 28, 2017
    Concerns over possible adverse effects of wartime exposure to smoke from trash burning in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other locations in Southwest Asia have stimulated both research and Congressional action. Public Law 112-260, § 201 (enacted January 10, 2013) directed the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to establish and maintain a registry for service members who may have been exposed to toxic airborne chemicals and fumes generated by open burn pits. VA asked the National Academies to take on the responsibility to fulfill a provision of this law that called for an independent scientific organization to prepare a report addressing issues related to the establishment and conduct of the registry and use of the information it collects.