Media Room

For More Information Contact

For Media Inquiries:

Dana Korsen
Phone:
202-334-2183
Fax:
202-334-2843
E-mail:
dkorsen@nas.edu

Mailing Address

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

Health and Medicine Division

500 Fifth St, NW
Washington, DC 20001

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News and Announcements

The latest news from HMD, including information about new reports, activities, meetings, and other noteworthy events.


News Release

Evidence Points to Potential Roles for Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy In Treating Traumatic Brain Injury but Further Research Needed
Released: 10/11/2011

There is some evidence about the potential value of cognitive rehabilitation therapy (CRT) for treating traumatic brain injury (TBI), but overall it is not sufficient to develop definitive guidelines on how to apply these therapies and to determine which type of CRT will work best for a particular patient, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine.

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Announcement

What You're Reading - September 2011

A list of the most viewed IOM reports for the month of September, 2011.

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News Release

Blue Water Navy Veterans’ Risk of Agent Orange-Related Health Problems Unclear
Released: 5/20/2011

Lack of essential data makes it impossible to say whether “Blue Water Navy” veterans -- who served aboard deep-sea vessels during the Vietnam War -- face higher, lower, or the same risk as other Vietnam veterans for long-term health problems associated with exposure to Agent Orange and other herbicides, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine.

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News Release

Protein and Calories Can Help Lessen Effects of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury; Benefits of Other Nutritional Approaches Need Further Study
Released: 4/20/2011

To help alleviate the effects of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), the U.S. Department of Defense should ensure that all military personnel with this type of injury receive adequate protein and calories immediately after the trauma and through the first two weeks of treatment, says a new report from the IOM.

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Media Advisory

TBI Therapy and Nutrition: IOM Report Releases April 20
Released: 4/14/2011

A new report from the IOM recommends which nutritional approaches DOD should adopt and priorities for further research into nutrients and diets that show promise for being effective in providing resilience or treating the immediate and near-term effects of brain injury, particularly TBI.

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News Release

Committee Chair Testifies on Gulf War Health Effects
Released: 7/27/2010

Dr. Stephen Hauser presented the IOM's most recent findings on the health effects of serving in the Gulf War to the House Committee on Veterans Affairs' Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations.

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News Release

Gulf War Service Linked to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Multisymptom Illness, Other Health Problems, But Causes Are Unclear
Released: 4/9/2010

Military service in the Persian Gulf War is a cause of post-traumatic stress disorder in some veterans and is also associated with multisymptom illness; gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome; substance abuse, particularly alcoholism; and psychiatric problems such as anxiety disorder, says the IOM's report Gulf War and Health: Volume 8. Health Effects of Serving in the Gulf War.

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News Release

Unanswered Questions, Lack of Data Hinder Agency Efforts to Meet Needs of Iraq, Afghanistan Service Members, Veterans, and Families
Released: 3/31/2010

To help current and former military personnel of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and their families readjust to post-deployment life, the U.S. departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs need to gather information to answer many uncertainties, including how many mental health care providers are needed and where, what works best in treating traumatic brain injury over the long term, and whether giving service members time to decompress before returning home would be beneficial, says a new IOM report.

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Actions Taken

Door Opens to Health Claims Tied to Agent Orange

As a result of the IOM’s report Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2008, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) issued a final rule on August 31, 2010, to add Parkinson’s disease, ischemic heart disease, hairy-cell leukemia, and other chronic B-cell leukemias to a list of conditions presumed to have been caused by Agent Orange, a defoliant used widely during the Vietnam War.

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News Release

Senator Calls for Increased TBI Screening and Research after Study Reveals Long-Term Toll on Veterans
Released: 1/5/2009

Senator Patty Murray (D-WA), a senior member of the Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee, issued a statement on December 4, 2008, calling for increased Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) screening and research, in direct response to the IOM report Gulf War and Health, Volume 7: Long-term Consequences of Traumatic Brain Injury.

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