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Gulf Research Program Advisory Board Members

Dr. Thomas O. Hunter, Chair
Sandia National Laboratories (Retired)

Dr. Porfirio Álvarez-Torres
Consortium of Marine Research Institutions of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean

Dr. Kim A. Anderson
Oregon State University

Dr. Elliot L. Atlas
University of Miami

Mr. Patrick A. Barnes
BFA Environmental

Dr. Donald F. Boesch
University of Maryland, Cambridge 

Mr. J. Ford Brett
PetroSkills

Dr. William L. Chameides, NAS
Duke University

Ms. Danielle Deane
The Raben Group

Dr. Bernard D. Goldstein, IOM
University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health (Emeritus)

Dr. William (Monty) Graham
University of Southern Mississippi

Dr. Sara J. Graves
University of Alabama in Huntsville

Dr. Myron Gutmann
University of Colorado at Boulder

Dr. Anthony H. Knap
Texas A&M University

Dr. Nancy G. Leveson, NAE
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Dr. Michael A. Macrander
Shell Alaska

Dr. Alonzo L. Plough
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Dr. Christopher M. Reddy
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Dr. Liesel A. Ritchie
University of Colorado at Boulder

Dr. Jonathan M. Samet, IOM 
University of Southern California
 
Mr. Richard Sears
Independent Consultant and Stanford University

Dr. LaDon Swann
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium
Auburn University 

Dr. Isiah M. Warner
Louisiana State University
 


Advisory Board Members' Biographies

Dr. Thomas O. Hunter, Chair 
Sandia National Laboratories (Retired) 

Dr. Tom Hunter led the government’s science team for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill with Dr. Steven Chu. He coauthored a major analysis on applications of science and engineering to quantify and control the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and served as chairman of Ocean Energy Safety Advisory Committee for the Department of Interior. Prior to his retirement in 2010, Dr. Hunter served as Sandia National Laboratories’ President and Laboratories Director. Dr. Hunter joined Sandia in 1967 and became President in April 2005. His responsibilities included managing the Laboratories' $2.3 billion annual budget and approximately 8,700 employees. At Sandia, he led major programs in Energy Development, Environmental Technology, Technology Transfer to US Industry, Information Systems and Nuclear Weapons Stewardship. Dr. Hunter also led Sandia and U.S. DOE laboratory programs to establish cooperative R&D programs in the former Soviet Union to support nuclear nonproliferation He engaged numerous members of the Federal Executive Branch and the US Congress in support of national security programs. Since retirement, Dr. Hunter has been a member of the PCAST panel for the report “Transformation and Opportunity: The Future of the US Research Enterprise.” He served as board member for the Energy Policy Initiative for the Bipartisan Policy Center. He is also a member of the Engineering Advisory Board for the University of Florida and the Council on Foreign Relations and was a member of the American Nuclear Society and the U. S. Strategic Command's Strategic Advisory Group. Dr. Hunter earned a BSME from the University of Florida, an MSME from the University of New Mexico, an MSNE from the University of Wisconsin, and a PhD in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Wisconsin. He was a member of the original Advisory Group for the Gulf Research Program. (Back to Top)

Dr. Porfirio Álvarez-Torres
Consortium of Marine Research Institutions of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean 

Dr. Porfirio Álvarez-Torres is the Executive Secretariat for the Consortium of Marine Research Institutions of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean. He graduated as hydrobiologist from the Metropolitan Autonomous University, and doctorate in Fisheries Science from the Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology. Dr. Álvarez-Torres is currently a professor and researcher at the National Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Álvarez Torres’ research interests focus on fisheries science and marine ecosystems. He was born in Mexico City and is a professor and researcher at various academic institutions including the Autonomous Metropolitan University, the National Polytechnic Institute and the National University of Mexico. Dr. Álvarez-Torres is currently serving as special advisor to the Secretary for Research and Postgraduate Studies at the National Polytechnic Institute. He has directed numerous projects within Mexico’s federal agencies dealing with marine resources, coastal marine spatial planning, and policies for oceans. Dr. Álvarez-Torres has also been the lead in the development and instrumentation of Mexico’s policies for oceans, and coordinated the Mexico-U.S. Gulf of Mexico Large Marine Ecosystem Project funded by the Global Environment Facility. He was appointed as advisor for Mexico’s permanent representation at UN, and has represented Mexico in multilateral forums related to oceans. Dr. Álvarez-Torres received the SANKEI award in Japan (1989) and the EPA Gulf Guardian Award (2013). (Back to top)

Dr. Kim A. Anderson
Oregon State University 

Dr. Kim Anderson is a professor in the Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology at Oregon State University, where she directs the Food Safety and Environmental Stewardship Program. Dr. Anderson’s research focuses on environmental exposure of contaminants and mixtures, and development of novel bio-analytical technologies for assessing bioavailability in multi-contaminant environments. She is the project leader in the NIEHS Superfund Research Program titled “Biological Response Indicator Devices for Gauging Environmental Stressors.” Dr. Anderson was recruited by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization in collaboration with the Global Environmental Fund to develop new program of international scope, to design bio-analytical technologies to conduct environmental assessment for use in setting of protective standards for human and environmental health. Her research is also focused on development of personal passive samplers, a silicone-based device structured as a wristband or lapel-pin, which has the potential to greatly expand the possibilities for developing quantitative measures of exposures in humans. Dr. Anderson has more than 70 refereed articles, and holds 4 patents. She is currently World Council Member for Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC), past member of the Board of Directors for SETAC North America, and founding member of the Chemistry Advisory Group. She received her PhD in Chemistry from Washington State University. She holds a BS in Geology from University of Oregon and a BS in Chemistry from Boise State University. (Back to Top)

Dr. Elliot L. Atlas
University of Miami 

Dr. Elliot Atlas is a professor in the department of atmospheric sciences at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS). Prior to joining the University of Miami, Dr. Atlas was a Senior Scientist and head of the Stratospheric/Tropospheric Measurements section in the Atmospheric Chemistry Division of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. He currently serves as Editor of the Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry. His research interests include the sources, transport, and transformation of atmospheric trace gases in the global atmosphere. Dr. Atlas’ work focuses primarily on trace gases and aerosols associated with the formation and destruction of ozone in the atmosphere. His research involves the development and application of advanced trace gas sampling and measurement techniques. Dr. Atlas’ research group investigates the distributions and trends of a large variety of halocarbons (both natural and man-made), hydrocarbons, and photochemical oxidation products of these species (such as organic nitrates). The research has included studies of sub-surface distribution of trace gases in the polar firn record, measurements of urban and regional chemical distributions of reactive tropospheric gases, evaluation of trace gas sources to the remote marine atmosphere, and measurement of halocarbons and hydrocarbons in the stratosphere up to 32 km altitude. The research platforms include tropospheric and stratospheric aircraft (C-130, P-3B, NSF Gulfstream V, ER-2, WB-57, NASA Global Hawk), high altitude balloons, oceanographic research ships, and land and island-based experiments. (Back to Top)

Mr. Patrick A. Barnes
BFA Environmental 

Mr. Patrick Barnes, P.G., is a professional geologist, and serves as President/CEO of Barnes, Ferland and Associates, Inc. (aka BFA Environmental). He founded BFA, a minority owned, multidiscipline environmental engineering, surveying and scientific consulting firm in 1994 to help address the environmental justice (EJ) issues faced by many underrepresented communities. In that vein, Mr. Barnes has served as an advisor for several EJ communities including Warren County North Carolina, the birth place of the EJ movement. In Warren County, he successfully assisted in implementing a $14 million detoxification and closure of the Warren County North Carolina PCB Landfill. He has a deep-seated commitment to providing job skills and credentials to help at-risk young adults. Accordingly, in the past decade he has focused on helping to build resiliency in vulnerable Gulf Coast communities through job training. At Its peak BFA had over 150 employees in the Gulf region, executing $20 million in contracts for the Army Corps of Engineers. Over 100 of those employees were entry-level employees recruited, trained and hired locally. With this workforce, BFA has completed similar emergency response and environmental restoration projects in Florida, Louisiana, and Texas. At the core of a successful restoration project is data collection and monitoring. Under contracts with the South Florida Water Management District, the agency charged with implementing the multibillion Everglades Restoration Program, Mr. Barnes managed 14 such work orders totaling 3.8 million dollars. These are the types of projects individuals from environmentally-impacted communities can participate in. Seeking to establish a lasting connection between his passion to help vulnerable communities and the environmental work needed to restore those communities, Mr. Barnes contributed $300,000 in seed capital to establish Limitless Vistas, Inc. (LVI) a New Orleans based 501c(3) non-profit. LVI is a workforce development entity and an active member of the national 21st Century Conservation and Service Corps movement. Since its inception LVI has trained and certified over 400 at-risk young adults for environmental and construction work, including emergency response and coastal restoration projects resulting from hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Gustav and Ike, and the BP oil spill. He currently serves as LVI’s Chairman of the Board and Technical Advisor. Under his management BFA/LVI is currently working with the State of Florida’s workforce investment agency, Career Source Florida, to provide short term environmental, geotechnical, construction inspection training to 180 low-income, unemployed and underemployed individuals. Mr. Barnes works extensively to create partnerships in the minority and larger business community, which have been instrumental in providing opportunities beyond training for these young adults. Additionally, he is a founding board member of the Florida Consortium of Black Business and an active voice in the New Orleans-based 504 Collaborative. Mr. Barnes is also a leader in the Conservation Corps movement and serves on the Corps Network Council. In April 2013, Mr. Barnes was recognized by the White House as a Champion of Change for his effort to bring environmental resiliency to vulnerable coastal communities through job training. (Back to Top)

Dr. Donald F. Boesch
University of Maryland, Cambridge 

Dr. Donald F. Boesch is a Professor of Marine Science and President of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. He also serves as Vice Chancellor for Environmental Sustainability for the University System of Maryland. Dr. Boesch is a biological oceanographer who has conducted research in coastal and continental shelf environments along the Atlantic Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico, eastern Australia and the East China Sea. He has published two books and more than 90 papers on marine benthos, estuaries, wetlands, continental shelves, oil pollution, nutrient over-enrichment, environmental assessment and monitoring and science policy. Presently his research focuses on the use of science in ecosystem management, and he is active in extending knowledge to environmental and resource management at regional, national and international levels. Dr. Boesch has served as science advisor to many state and federal agencies and regional, national and international programs, and has chaired numerous committees and scientific assessment teams that have produced reports on a wide variety of coastal environmental and climate change issues. He was a member of the National Academies Committee on America’s Climate Choice and served as chair of the National Research Council’s Ocean Studies Board. A native of New Orleans, Boesch received his B.S. from Tulane University and Ph.D. from the College of William & Mary. He was a Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Queensland and subsequently served on the faculty of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. In 1980 he became the first Executive Director of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, where he was also a Professor of Marine Science at Louisiana State University. He assumed his present position in Maryland in 1990. Dr. Boesch served as a member of the President’s 7-member Oil Spill Commission, formed immediately after the Deepwater Horizon spill to investigate the root causes of the blowout. He was also a member of the Gulf Research Program's original Advisory Group. (Back to Top)

Mr. J. Ford Brett
PetroSkills 

Mr. J. Ford Brett, P.E., is the CEO of PetroSkills, which is the world’s largest training organization for the oil and gas workforce, offering courses and e-learning opportunities to more than 28,000 people. In 2012, he served on the National Academies’ Committee on the Effectiveness of Safety and Environmental Management Systems for Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Operations. In 2010, he advised the U.S. Department of Interior as one of seven reviewers of the “30 Day Study” immediately following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Mr. Brett has consulted in over 45 countries worldwide in the area of Petroleum Process and Project Management. Prior to joining PetroSkills, he was with Amoco Production Co. where he worked on drilling projects in the Bering Sea, the North Slope of Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico, offshore Trinidad, and Wyoming, and led a project that first identified drill bit whirl (which the Oil and Gas Journal lists as one of the 100 most significant developments in the history of the petroleum industry). Mr. Brett has been granted over 30 US and international patents and authored over 30 technical publications. He has also served the Society of Petroleum Engineers International Board of Directors as Drilling and Completions Technical Director. Mr. Brett holds a BS in mechanical engineering and physics from Duke University, a MS in Engineering from Stanford University and a MBA from Oklahoma State University. He is a registered Professional Engineer and a Project Management Professional. (Back to Top)

Dr. William L. Chameides, NAS
Duke University 

Dr. William Chameides is professor of the environment in the Earth and Ocean Sciences Division of Duke University. He joined Duke as the Dean of the Nicholas School of the Environment in 2007. Prior to joining Duke he spent 3 years as the chief scientist of the Environmental Defense Fund, following more than 30 years in academia as a professor, researcher, teacher, and mentor. Chameides’ research focuses on the atmospheric sciences, elucidating the causes of and remedies for global, regional, and urban environmental change and identifying pathways towards a more sustainable future. Specifically his research helped lay the groundwork for our understanding of the photochemistry of the lower atmosphere, elucidated the importance of nitrogen oxides emission controls in the mitigation of urban and regional photochemical smog, and the impact of regional air pollution on global food production. He has led two major, multi-institutional research projects: the Southern Oxidants Study, a research program focused on understanding the causes and remedies for air pollution in the Southern United States; and CHINA-MAP, an international research program studying the effects of environmental change on agriculture in China. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, fellow of the American Geophysical Union and recipient of the American Geophysical Union’s MacElwane Award. Chameides has served on numerous national and international committees and task forces and in recognition was named a National Associate of the National Academies for “extraordinary service.” (Back to Top)

Ms. Danielle Dean
The Raben Group 

Ms. Danielle Deane is a Principal at The Raben Group, which provides services such as public policy development, coalition-building, political council, and strategic communications to a variety of clients. Danielle is the Director of Green 2.0 initiative, convened by The Raben Group to advocate for improved diversity within the mainstream environmental movement. Danielle’s ability to strategize with diverse leaders to solve problems stems from her unique blend of multi-sector experience spanning the social change, corporate, and science sectors. Previously, as Director of the Energy & Environment Program at the Joint Center for Political & Economic Studies, Danielle managed the Commission to Engage African Americans on Energy, Climate Change & the Environment. The Commission is a national panel of leading experts from government, industry, academia, labor, and environmental interests. Prior to that, Danielle was a Program Officer at the Hewlett Foundation for the maximum 8-year term. She was responsible for investing over $20 million to design and execute the “New Constituencies for the Environment” initiative (now called “Broad Based Support”) to expand and strengthen the range of organizations working on clean air and climate change in California. The initiative contributed to increased focus on air pollution by Latino and African American political leaders and successful advocacy to address climate equity and diesel pollution. Danielle also served on the board of the Environmental Grantmakers Association. She was a Fellow of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, which won the Zayed Prize. Previously Danielle was a financial analyst at the international reinsurance brokerage arm of Marsh and McLennan Companies. She also conducted research at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies. Danielle holds a M.Sc. from the London School of Economics in Environment and Development, and a B.A. from Williams College in Political Economy with an Environmental Studies Concentration. She is a native of Trinidad and Tobago. (Back to Top)

Dr. Bernard D. Goldstein, IOM
University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health (Emeritus)

Dr. Bernard Goldstein, IOM, is emeritus professor of environmental and occupational health and former dean of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Dr. Goldstein is an elected member of the National Academies of Sciences' Institute of Medicine (IOM) where he serves on the Environmental Health Science Research and Training Roundtable. For the National Research Council he is a member of the Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability, has recently chaired the Committee on Sustainability at EPA, and is a member of the committee organizing workshops on Risk Management and Governance of Shale Gas. He also serves on committees related to shale gas and energy issues for the Canadian Council of Academies, the Energy Institute of the Province of New Brunswick and the NSF-funded AirWaterGas Sustainability Research Network at the University of Colorado . He has chaired numerous national and international committees related to environmental health, most recently the UN Environmental Program Working Group on Chemical Governance. Dr. Goldstein was a participant in the IOM’s workshop on Assessing the Effects of the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill on Human Health. Currently, he chairs the Coordinating Committee of the Gulf Region Health Outreach Program and is a member of the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Public Health Working Group. His experience includes service as Assistant Administrator for Research and Development of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1983-1985. Dr. Goldstein was a member of the Gulf Research Program's original Advisory Group. (Back to Top)

Dr. William (Monty) Graham
University of Southern Mississippi 

Dr. Monty Graham is the Chair of the Department of Marine Science at The University of Southern Mississippi located at Stennis Space Center, where he is also a Professor of Marine Science. Previous to this, he was a Senior Marine Scientist at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab in Alabama. Dr. Graham is a biological oceanographer with a specialization in gelatinous planton. Though his interest in ‘jellies’ is broad, ranging from physiology of individuals to global patterns of populations, his primary research explores the causes and consequences of jellyfish variability in heavily fished ecosystems. Dr. Graham serves as a Board representative and is the past Chair of the Gulf of Mexico University Research Collaborative. He also serves as a member representative on the Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Southeastern Universities Research Association, and the Northern Gulf Institute. Dr. Graham participated as University President’s representative on Governor’s GoCoast2020. He received his undergraduate degree in marine biology from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. His master's and doctorate were granted from the University of California-Santa Cruz. His post-doctoral work was conducted at UC-Santa Barbara. (Back to Top)

Dr. Sara J. Graves
University of Alabama in Huntsville 

Dr. Sara Graves is the Director of the Information Technology and Systems Center, Board of Trustees University Professor and Professor of Computer Science at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. She directs research and development in sustainable distributed data infrastructures, data mining and knowledge discovery, semantic technologies, information analytics, and cyber security/resilience. Dr. Graves was recently elected to the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing Systems (GCOOS) Board of Directors, part of the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS); GCOOS seeks to facilitate the establishment of a sustained and integrated observing systems for the Gulf of Mexico. Dr. Graves is currently a member of the National Academies' Board on Research Data and Information (BRDI), the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) Board of Trustees, the Climate Change Science Institute (CCSI) Science Advisory Board of the DOE Oak Ridge National Laboratory. She has also served as a member of the NASA Headquarters Earth System Science and Applications Advisory Committee (ESSAAC) and Chair of the ESSAAC Subcommittee on Information Systems and Services (ESISS), as well as a founding member of the NOAA Science Advisory Board Data Archives and Access Requirements Working Group. Dr. Graves has been the Principal Investigator on many research projects with NASA, NOAA, National Science Foundation (NSF), Department of Energy, Department of Defense and other entities. She received her PhD in computer science from the University of Alabama in Huntsville. (Back to Top)

Dr. Myron Gutmann
University of Colorado at Boulder 

Dr. Myron Gutmann is a professor of history at the University of Colorado at Boulder. From 2009 to 2013, he served as Assistant Director of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), with responsibility for NSF’s Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Directorate. Dr. Gutmann spearheaded NSF’s initiative to improve access to publications and data. He was Director of the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) at the University of Michigan, the world’s largest repository of publicly-available data in the social and behavioral sciences. Dr. Gutmann was also Professor of History and Information and Research Professor in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. He has written or edited five books and more than 80 articles and chapters. Dr. Gutmann is a Fellow of the AAAS, and has served on a numerous national and international advisory committees and editorial boards. His broad range of interests include interdisciplinary historical population studies, especially relating population to agricultural, the environment, and health. Dr. Gutmann also studies ways that digital materials can be properly preserved and shared, and how the confidentiality of research subjects can be protected when data about them is made available for secondary use. He teaches about historical demography and about the social, demographic, and economic history of Europe and the Americas. Dr. Gutmann received his PhD from Princeton University. (Back to Top)

Dr. Anthony H. Knap
Texas A&M University 

Dr. Anthony Knap is the James R. Whatley Endowed Chair in Geosciences, Professor of Oceanography, and Director of Geochemical and Environmental Research Group (GERG) at Texas A&M University. He received his PhD in chemical oceanography and MS in oceanography from University of Southampton, UK and his BS from Wisconsin State University. Dr. Knap has had extensive experience with both chemical and physical monitoring systems in the Gulf and elsewhere. The research group that he directs (GERG) has a long history of work in the Gulf of Mexico, including the operation of a number of instrumented buoys (Texas Automated Buoy System – TABS) and other sustained monitoring systems in the Gulf of Mexico. For many years he was director and president of the Bermuda Biological Station, later the Bermuda Institute for Ocean Sciences, which he converted into a global leader in ocean research and education. He founded and was the PI for 25 years of the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) established in 1988 as well as being the PI for 30 years of the longest continuous open ocean time-series founded by Henry Stommel in 1954 as the Panulirus Stations. With Anthony Michaels he founded the Risk Prediction Initiative (RPI), a business/science partnership that still exists today after over 20 years, bringing climate science to the insurance world. He is very interested in the intersection of business and climate science and has made presentations on climate and business to companies such as Barclays Wealth, Barclays Capital, HSBC, Consortia of Energy Companies, many insurance companies such as Amlin, Catlin, Flagstone, XL, Lloyds of London as well as conferences such as the World Insurance Forum and the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Dr. Knap has worked on major oil spills and dispersant use in the tropics and temperate environments. He founded the International Center for Ocean and Human Health in 1998, which led to the beginning of NSF/NIEHS collaboration in establishing a centers program connecting the two. Dr. Knap’s research interests include oceanography, ocean observing organic geochemistry, environmental science, atmosphere/ocean interactions, oil pollution and dispersant use, effects of contaminants on the marine environment, ocean health and human health interactions. One of the most interesting collaborations was with J.C. Venter publishing the “Ocean Genome” in 2004. Dr. Knap has over 150 peer reviewed publications relating to the subjects listed. He has served on many national and international science panels. He was the Chairman of the Health of the Ocean Committee for the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS), then co-chaired the Coastal Panel of GOOS for 8 years with Tom Malone resulting in the GOOS coastal strategic plan and then the implementation plan. He presently serves on the Scientific Steering Committee for the GOOS of the IOC and is a member of the Executive Committee of the Partnership of Observations of the Global Ocean (POGO). He has served on various commercial company boards and is presently a Director of Maritime Insurance Solutions, Ltd. (Back to Top)

Dr. Nancy G. Leveson, NAE
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Dr. Nancy Leveson is a Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering Systems at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. An acknowledged leader in the field of safety engineering, she has worked in nearly every industry over the past 30 years. Dr. Leveson has extensive experience advising on oil spill-related accidents and risk management in the oil and gas industry, including corporate safety culture, safety management systems, and corporate safety oversight , and including work related to the Deepwater Horizon explosion, the Texas City refinery explosion, and other incidents. She holds a PhD from University of California, Los Angeles. She was a Computer Science professor at the University of California, then became Boeing Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington before moving to MIT in 1997. Dr. Leveson’s research focuses on topics related to the design of complex systems containing software, hardware, and human components. Her goal is to stretch current limits of complexity and intellectual manageability of the systems that can be built with reasonable resources and with confidence in their expected behavior, particularly safety. She was an expert consultant to the Presidential Commission on Deepwater Horizon (and helped write the final report), a member of the Baker Panel on the Texas City Explosion, a member of the Dept. of Interior’s Ocean Energy Safety Advisory Committee, a consultant to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, a member of the NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel, and has participated on numerous other international study committees. Dr. Leveson has published over 200 research papers, given over 300 invited talks, and has published two single-authored books: Safeware (in 1995) and Engineering a Safer World (in 2012). She has received numerous research and professional awards in her career and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2000. (Back to Top)

Dr. Michael A. Macrander
Shell Alaska 

Dr. Michael Macrander is Chief Scientist for Shell Alaska. In this role he is responsible for planning, directing, and implementing a diverse portfolio of scientific investigations and monitoring in the Alaskan Arctic. This includes onshore and offshore studies programs and is directed at understanding broad baseline environmental and ecological conditions monitoring and assessment interactions between industry activities and the environment, and assessing impacts of an overall changing Arctic. He also serves on the Advisory Panel for the North Pacific Research Board (NPRB) and the Science and Technical Advisory Panel for the North Slope Advisory Panel. Before his position in Alaska, he worked for Shell for 17 years in Houston, studying, among other things coastal land, loss wetlands restoration, and marine resource monitoring. Through his 30 year career, Dr. Macrander has focused his investigative efforts on multiple aspects of environmental ecology, management, and regulation, including wetlands, threatened and endangered species protection, ecological risk evaluation, and the evaluation of the impacts of oil spills. He earned his PhD in biological sciences from the University of Alabama. (Back to Top)

Dr. Alonzo L. Plough
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 

Dr. Alonzo Plough joined the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation as vice president, Research-Evaluation-Learning and chief science officer in January 2014. Plough came to the Foundation from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, where he served as director of emergency preparedness and response from 2009–2013. In that role, Plough was responsible for the leadership and management of the public health preparedness activities protecting the 10 million residents of Los Angeles County from natural disasters and threats related to disease outbreaks and other public health emergencies. He coordinated activities in emergency operations, infectious disease control, risk communication, planning, and community engagement. Prior to this position, Plough served as vice president of strategy, planning and evaluation for The California Endowment from 2005–2009. He was responsible for the leadership of the Endowment’s strategic planning and development, evaluation, research, and organizational learning. Plough also served 10 years as director and health officer for the Seattle and King County Department of Public Health, and professor of health services at the University of Washington School of Public Health in Seattle. He previously served as director of public health in Boston for eight years. Plough earned his PhD and MA at Cornell University, and his MPH at Yale University School of Medicine’s Department of Epidemiology and Public Health. He earned a BA at St. Olaf College. He has held academic appointments at Harvard University School of Public Health, Tufts University Department of Community Medicine, and Boston University School of Management. He has been the recipient of numerous awards for public service and leadership and is the author of an extensive body of scholarly articles, books, and book chapters. (Back to Top)

Dr. Christopher M. Reddy
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution 

Dr. Christopher Reddy is a senior scientist in the Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), where he studies marine pollution, petroleum geochemistry, and useful chemicals from the sea. Dr. Reddy has extensive experience with the Deepwater Horizon (DWH), including being the academic liaison at the Unified Area Command where he interacted with and provided guidance to state, federal, and BP officials. He had led or participated in two major research cruises on the DWH, many small boat operations, overflights, and runs an active field program sampling the beaches of the Gulf from Pensacola, FL to Port Fourchon, LA. Dr. Reddy has authored 16 peer-reviewed manuscripts on the DWH and numerous opinion pieces on many aspects of the science, society, and the media of the disaster. He was a Kavli Fellow, awarded in 2009, 2010, and 2011 (chair) by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences; a recipient of the John B. Phillips Award in honor of the inventor of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography; an Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow; a recipient of the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program Award.; and received the C.C. Patterson Award for leading an innovative breakthrough of fundamental significance in environmental geochemistry, particularly in service to society. Dr. Reddy received a BS in chemistry from Rhode Island College and a PhD in chemical oceanography from the Graduate School of Oceanography, URI. He earned an executive education certificate in management and leadership at MIT's Sloan School of Business and completed leadership training at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Dr. Reddy has published over 140 peer-reviewed manuscripts and holds four US patents. (Back to Top)

Dr. Liesel A. Ritchie
University of Colorado at Boulder 

Dr. Liesel Ritchie is Associate Director of the Natural Hazards Center at the University of Colorado at Boulder and a research professor with joint appointments in CU Boulder’s Institute of Behavioral Science and Environmental Studies Program. She received her PhD in Sociology from Mississippi State University in 2004. Dr. Ritchie has served as either principal investigator or senior researcher on almost 80 projects since 1996, with funding from agencies and organizations including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Science Foundation (NSF), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI). Since 2000, her focus has been on the social impacts of disasters with an emphasis on technological disasters, social capital, renewable resource communities, and community resilience. In October 2014, Dr. Ritchie was selected by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to serve as a Disaster Resilience Fellow for the Societal Dimensions of Disasters. Dr. Ritchie currently directs two NSF projects–one on the 2008 TVA Kingston Fossil Plant ash release and another on social impacts of litigation and settlement activities related to the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil disaster. She recently completed work on another NSF-funded project on long-term social impacts of litigation associated with the Exxon Valdez oil spill. She is co-PI on another newly-funded NSF project to develop an integrated approach to measuring dynamic economic resilience following disasters, with Superstorm Sandy as a case study. She is also leading evaluation efforts for the USGS's Science Applications for Risk Reduction (SAFRR) Program and is conducting social impact assessment work regarding oil and liquefied natural gas development activities in western Canada. Dr. Ritchie was coeditor of the January 2012 issue of American Behavioral Scientist on the BP disaster and is author or coauthor on six recent articles related to her work on that event, the Exxon Valdez oil spill, and the earthquake in Haiti. Between 2006 and 2012 she was chair and program co-chair of the American Evaluation Association topical interest group on disaster and emergency management evaluation. She currently serves on the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute’s Learning from Earthquakes committee. (Back to Top)

Dr. Jonathan M. Samet, IOM
University of Southern California 

Dr. Jonathan Samet, a pulmonary physician and epidemiologist, is currently Distinguished Professor and Flora L. Thornton Chair for the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California and Director, USC Institute for Global Health. He is trained in the specialty of internal medicine and in the subspecialty of pulmonary diseases. Dr. Samet has investigated diverse health issues using epidemiological approaches. His research has focused on the health risks of inhaled pollutants—particles and ozone in outdoor air and indoor pollutants including secondhand smoke and radon. Dr. Samet has also investigated the occurrence and causes of cancer and respiratory diseases, emphasizing the risks of active and passive smoking. He has served on numerous committees of the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine, including chairing the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR VI) Committee and most recently the Committee to Review the IRIS Process. For several decades, Dr. Samet has been involved in global health, focused on tobacco control, air pollution, and chronic disease prevention. He has been chair of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee of the U.S. EPA and currently chairs the FDA’s Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. He was appointed to the National Cancer Advisory Board in 2011. Dr. Samet has served as editor and author for reports of the Surgeon General on smoking and health since 1984, receiving the Surgeon General’s Medallion in 1990 and 2006 for these contributions. He was the senior scientific editor for the 50th Anniversary 2014 report. Dr. Samet received the 2004 Prince Mahidol Award for Global Health awarded by the King of Thailand, and the 2006 Public Service Award of the American Thoracic Society, the Alton Ochsner Award Relating Smoking and Health, the WHO World No Tobacco Day Award, the Doll-Wynder Award from SRNT and the Edward Livingston Trudeau Medal from the American Thoracic Society/American Lung Association. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 1997. (Back to Top)

Mr. Richard Sears
Independent Consultant and Stanford University 

Mr. Richard Sears, a geophysicist, is a consulting professor at Stanford University. As chief scientist for the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling, Mr. Sears provided technical and policy recommendations on offshore drilling to prevent future accidents of this type. Mr. Sears provided technical expertise to the investigation into the causes of the incident, and in the preparation of recommendations to the Commission. He was responsible for accessing industry expertise to aid the Commission in carrying out its duties, and was a contributing author of the Chief Counsel’s Report, which detailed the technical and managerial factors leading to the blowout and spill. Mr. Sears also served as a member of the Department of Interior’s Ocean Energy Safety Advisory Committee. During his 33 years with Shell Oil Co. and Royal Dutch Shell, Mr. Sears acquired significant domestic and international experience in the upstream oil and gas industry, holding technical and managerial positions including exploration geophysicist, technical instructor, economist, strategic planner, and general management. He received a BS in physics and an MS in geophysics from Stanford University. (Back to Top)

Dr. LaDon Swann
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium
Auburn University 

Dr. LaDon Swann is Director of the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium (MASGC), and Director of the Auburn University’s Marine Programs.  He received BS and MS from Tennessee Technological University and a Ph.D. from Purdue University.  Dr. Swann is responsible for implementing practical solutions to coastal issues through competitive research, graduate student training, and extension and outreach and K-12 education in Alabama and Mississippi.  He also has over 29 years of experience designing, delivering and evaluating engagement programs addressing local, regional and national needs.  Dr. Swann is actively involved in regional engagement through the NOAA Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaboration Team, multiple Gulf of Mexico Alliance priority issues teams.  During 2010 and 2011, he served on the Oil Spill Recovery Commissions for Alabama and Mississippi, participated in the Community Resilience working group for the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force, and served as a primary point of contact for NOAA’s engagement efforts.  In 2012, Dr. Swann served on the Mississippi GoCoast 2020 oil spill recovery planning effort.  He is president of the National Sea Grant Association and a member of the Ocean Research Advisory Panel. Dr. Swann was a member of the original Gulf Research Program Advisory Group.  He is also past co-chair of the 2014-2017 Strategic Planning Committee for the National Sea Grant College Program and a past-president of the U.S. Aquaculture Association.  Dr. Swann and his wife, Roberta, were Peace Corps Volunteers in Togo, Africa. They have two sons, William and Gage, and live near Dauphin Island, AL. (Back to Top)

Dr. Isiah M. Warner
Louisiana State University 

Dr. Isiah Warner is Vice Chancellor for Strategic Initiatives, Philip W. West Professor of Chemistry, and a Boyd Professor of the Louisiana State University system. He has more than 300 refereed publications in a variety of journals relevant to the general areas of analytical and materials chemistry. His particular expertise is in the area of fluorescence spectroscopy, where his research has focused for more than 35 years. More recently, his research has focused in the area of ionic liquid chemistry applied to solid phase materials for applications in materials chemistry and nanomaterials. Research interests include the development and application of improved methodologies (chemical, mathematical, and instrumental) for studies of complex chemical systems including environmental chemistry, using tools such as fluorescence spectroscopy, separation science, nanomaterials, automated methods of analysis, and chemistry in organized media. Professor Warner has also conducted educational research that focuses on mechanisms for maintaining and enhancing student education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), with a particular focus on encouraging these students to pursue terminal degrees. He is involved in many projects that focus on diversity in STEM education. One major effort has been with the Louisiana State University Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Scholars Program (LA-STEM). The goal of this program was to promote the life and diversity of the STEM student body by encouraging students with diverse backgrounds and experiences to pursue PhDs in STEM fields. Dr. Warner is also a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Professor, an honor given to distinguished researchers who also pursue educational research. Dr. Warner has recently been honored with the 2014 Oesper Award, 2013 American Chemical Society (ACS) Award in Analytical Chemistry, 2011 LSU Kiwanis Club Distinguished Leadership Award, 2010 Society for Applied Spectroscopy (SAS) Fellow, and 2009 ACS Inaugural Fellow. Dr. Warner was born in DeQuincy, LA (Calcasieu Parish) and grew up in Bunkie, LA (Avoyelles Parish). He graduated cum laude from Southern University with a BS. After working for Battelle Northwest in Richland, WA for five years, he attended graduate school at the University of Washington, receiving his PhD in chemistry (analytical) in June 1977. (Back to Top)
 

Gulf Research Program Advisory Group Members (2013-2014)

Under the leadership of Dr. Barbara Schaal, the original Gulf Research Program Advisory Group developed a strategic vision that established the Program's foundation and identified opportunities to contribute lasting benefit to the Gulf region and the nation. In fall 2014, Program oversight transitioned from the Advisory Group to a newly appointed Advisory Board charged with implementing the Program's vision.

Members of the original Advisory Group are listed below:

Dr. Barbara A. Schaal, NAS, Chair
Washington University, St. Louis 

Dr. Donald F. Boesch
University of Maryland, Cambridge 

Dr. Robert S. Carney
Louisiana State University 

Dr. Stephen R. Carpenter, NAS
University of Wisconsin, Madison 

Dr. Cortis K. Cooper
Chevron Corporation 

Dr. Courtney Cowart
Sewanee: The University of the South 

Dr. Robert A. Duce
Distinguished Professor Emeritus
Texas A&M University, College Station 

Dr. Deborah Estrin, NAE
Cornell New York City Tech 

Dr. Christopher B. Field, NAS
Carnegie Institution for Science 

Dr. Gerardo Gold-Bouchot
Center for Research and Advanced Studies at Merida

Dr. Lynn R. Goldman, IOM
George Washington University 

Dr. Bernard D. Goldstein, IOM
University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health 

Dr. Thomas O. Hunter
Sandia National Laboratories (Retired) 
 

Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson, NAE
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Dr. Ashanti Johnson
University of Texas at Arlington
Institute for Broadening Participation

Dr. David M. Karl, NAS
University of Hawaii

Ms. Molly McCammon
Alaska Ocean Observing System

Dr. Linda A. McCauley, IOM
Emory University 

Dr. J. Steven Picou
University of South Alabama 

Dr. Eduardo Salas
University of Central Florida 

Mr. Kerry Michael St. Pé
Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program 

Dr. Arnold F. Stancell, NAE
Mobil Oil (Retired)
Georgia Institute of Technology (Emeritus) 

Dr. LaDon Swann
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium
Auburn University 

Mr. James W. Ziglar
Van Ness Feldman 

Dr. Mark D. Zoback, NAE
Stanford University 
 

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